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3 Top Tips on Multi-Gen Succession Planning

3 Top Tips on Multi-Gen Succession Planning

Succession plans that include next-generation advisors take more finesse than an outright sale. Here are several ways to best address the challenge.

 


 

By Patrick Farrell
Investacorp President & CEO

Independent financial advisors who are ready to retire often seek expert guidance on how to execute succession planning deals with younger advisors.

But independent advisors with family heirs to their business may not always feel the same need to connect with experts on how best to transfer their business to the next generation of their family. And this can lead to serious missteps.

Indeed, when family is involved, financials and business realities can take a back seat to emotions.

Even when passing a practice onto adult children or other relatives functions as an inheritance instead of a purchase that funds the seller’s retirement, the transaction should undergo the process of a rigorous business valuation, analysis of the client base, and consideration of where the succeeding advisor plans to take the practice in the future.

Furthermore, timing matters. Advisors who plan to retire in a year face different challenges than those who plan to retire in six years.

Similarly, advisors turning the business over to a single generation of heirs have different options than those who have heirs of multiple generations — for instance both adult children and adult grandchildren — who are ready to assume stakes in the business.

Here are three best practices for conducting multigenerational succession planning for an advisory practice.

#1 — Seek out consultants who can help create a succession plan that fits your needs.

If you and your family have either not thought out, or not openly discussed, every single option and contingency about passing on the practice, an expert consultant becomes vital.

Continue reading the full editorial at ThinkAdvisor.

 


 

For more information, please contact:

Leslie Vigil
Senior Vice President of Business Development
Investacorp, Inc.
O: 305-901-1825
LVigil@investacorp.com

 


 

For Financial Professional Use Only

2018-12-03T14:19:20+00:00December 3, 2018|